Books for the First-Year Experience from Macmillan

First Year Experience Catalog cover Macmillan is pleased to offer a diverse selection of broadly appealing, critically acclaimed books—all of them ideally suited for First-Year Experience and Common  Reading programs.

Now, our latest catalog is online, and you can browse title by title, by theme, or by author. Then, request examination copies online, by email, by postal mail, or by fax. You can also download the catalog to view or print (10 MB PDF – Adobe Reader is required). You can also download our high resolution catalog here (18.6 MB PDF – Adobe Reader is required). Paper-and-ink catalogs are available by postal mail upon request.

Accessible yet challenging, timely yet classic, these are books that invite campus-wide discussion while also fostering individual growth, that ask questions and make demands of all who pick them up—books meant to open doors, change minds, undercut assumptions, spark debates.

Above all, these books will help students to succeed across all manner of academic disciplines by addressing them—and stimulating them, and moving them—as only the best books can. As a class or on their own, freshmen achieve their very best, as readers and as students, when they’re “on the same page” as their peers. That’s where these books come in.

My Seven Black Fathers

My Seven Black Fathers

Farrar, Straus & Giroux
Hardcover
240 pages • $28.00
ISBN: 9780374604875
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A Young Activist’s Memoir of Race, Family, and the Mentors Who Made Him Whole

Will Jawando

“A manifesto on the importance of intergenerational mentorship in the Black community.”

—Manuel Betancourt, The New York Times

As a boy growing up outside DC, Will, who went by his Nigerian name, Yemi, was shunted from school to school, never quite fitting in. He was a Black kid with a divorced white mother, a frayed relationship with his biological father, and teachers who scolded him for being disruptive. Eventually, he became close to Kalfani, a kid he looked up to on the basketball court. Years after he got the call telling him that Kalfani was dead, another victim of gun violence, Will looks back on the relationships he had with a series of extraordinary mentors who enabled him to thrive. Among them were Mr. Williams, the rare Black male grade school teacher, who found a way to bolster Will’s self-esteem; Deen Sanwoola, the businessman who helped him bridge the gap between his American upbringing and his Nigerian heritage, eventually leading to a dramatic reconciliation with his biological father; and President Barack Obama, who made Will his associate director of public engagement at the White House. Without the influence of these men, Will knows he would not be who he is today: a civil rights and education policy attorney, a civic leader, a husband, and a father. Drawing on Will’s inspiring personal story, My Seven Black Fathers offers a transformative way for Black men to shape the next generation.

Will Jawando

© Gioncarlo Valentine

Will Jawando is an attorney, an activist, a community leader, and a councilmember in Montgomery County, Maryland, a diverse community of more than one million residents. Called “the progressive leader we need” by the late congressman John Lewis, Jawando has worked with Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senator Sherrod Brown, and President Barack Obama. His writing has appeared in The Washington Post and The Root and on BET.com, and his work has been featured in The New York Times and New York magazine and on NPR, NBC News, and MTV. He regularly appears on CNN, MSNBC, and other media outlets.

Dirty Work

Dirty Work

Picador
Paperback
320 pages • $18.00
ISBN: 9781250849342
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Essential Jobs and Hidden Toll of
Inequality in America

Eyal Press

Dirty Work, a disturbing and necessary new book by Eyal Press, describes with great empathy the lives of workers who do jobs that they themselves find morally horrifying . . . But the book isn’t entirely about those workers. It’s about us. Press’s thesis is that our society confers on these workers an ‘unconscious mandate’ to do jobs that are morally objectionable and at the same time wants those jobs to remain invisible.”

Tamsin Shaw, The New York Times

Drone pilots who carry out targeted assassinations. Undocumented immigrants who man the “kill floors” of industrial slaughterhouses. Guards who patrol the wards of the United States’ most violent and abusive prisons. The COVID-19 pandemic has drawn unprecedented attention to the health and safety risks to which essential workers are exposed—but Dirty Work examines a less familiar set of occupational hazards: psychological and emotional hardships such as stigma, shame, PTSD, and moral injury. These burdens fall disproportionately on low-income workers, undocumented immigrants, women, and people of color. Illuminating the moving, sometimes harrowing stories of the people doing society’s dirty work, and incisively examining the structures of power and complicity that shape their lives, Eyal Press offers a paradigm-shifting view of the moral landscape of contemporary America through the stories of people who perform society’s most ethically troubling jobs.

Eyal Press

© Steven Kane

Eyal Press is an author and a journalist based in New York. The recipient of the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, an Andrew Carnegie fellowship, a Cullman Center fellowship at the New York Public Library, and a Puffin Foundation fellowship at Type Media Center, he is a contributor to The New YorkerThe New York Times, and numerous other publications. He is the author of Beautiful Souls and Absolute Convictions.

Unbound

Unbound

Flatiron Books: An Oprah Book
Paperback
288 pages • $17.99
ISBN: 9781250621740
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My Story of Liberation and the Birth of the Me Too Movement

Tarana Burke

“In her searing memoir, Tarana Burke, founder of the Me Too Movement, reflects on her childhood, the events that led her to say those two words and all that came after.”

Time

Tarana Burke didn’t always have the courage to say “me too.” As a child, she reeled from her sexual assault, believing she was responsible. Unable to confess what she thought of as her own sins for fear of shattering her family, she split in two. One side was the bright, intellectually curious third-generation Bronxite who was steeped in Black literature and power, and the other was the bad, shame-ridden girl who thought of herself as a dirty rule breaker, not as a victim or a survivor. She tucked one away behind a wall of pain and anger, which seemed to work . . . until it didn’t. Tarana fought to reunite her fractured self, through organizing, pursuing justice, and finding community. Here she shares her extensive work supporting and amplifying the power of Black and brown girls, and the devastating realization that to truly help these girls, she needed to help that scared, ashamed child still within her. It was her experience caring for Heaven, Diamond, and countless others that gave her the courage to embrace her own pain. Unbound is the story of an inimitable woman’s inner strength and perseverance, all in pursuit of bringing healing to her community and the world around her. At its essence, though, this story is about all of us—our possibility, our empathy, our power—and about the leader we each have inside.

Tarana Burke

© Dougal MacArthur

Tarana Burke has always been struck by a commitment to justice and equity. As the founder of the ‘me too.’ Movement and subsequent nonprofit, Burke works to dismantle the cycle of sexual violence and other systemic issues that disproportionately affect marginalized people. She has received numerous accolades and awards, including Time magazine’s Person of the Year, Time’s 100 Most Influential People, the Sydney Peace Prize, and USA Today’s Women of the Decade. She is the co-editor of the New York Times bestseller You Are Your Best Thing.

Thinking 101

Thinking 101

Flatiron Books
Hardcover
288 pages • $28.99
ISBN: 9781250805959
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How to Reason Better to Live Better

Woo-kyoung Ahn

“Ahn uses wonderfully engaging examples to show how we can understand and improve our reasoning.”

—Anna Rosling Rönnlund, New York Times bestselling co-author of Factfulness

Psychologist Woo-kyoung Ahn devised a course at Yale called “Thinking” to help students examine the biases that cause so many problems in their daily lives. It quickly became one of the university’s most popular courses. Now, for the first time, Ahn presents key insights from her years of teaching and research in a book for everyone. She shows how “thinking problems” stand behind a wide range of challenges, from common, self-inflicted daily aggravations to our most pressing societal issues and inequities. Throughout, Ahn draws on decades of research from other cognitive psychologists, as well as from her own groundbreaking studies. And she presents it all in a compellingly readable style that uses fun examples from pop culture, anecdotes from her own life, and illuminating stories from history and the headlines. Thinking 101 is a book that goes far beyond other books on thinking, showing how we can improve not just our own daily lives through better awareness of our biases but also the lives of everyone around us. It is, quite simply, required reading for everyone who wants to think—and live—better.

Woo-kyoung Ahn

© studio DUDA

Woo-kyoung Ahn is is the John Hay Whitney Professor of Psychology at Yale University. After receiving her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, she was assistant professor at Yale University and associate professor at Vanderbilt University. In 2022, she received Yale’s Lex Hixon Prize for Teaching Excellence in the Social Sciences. Her research on thinking biases has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, and she is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science.

The Book of Hope

The Book of Hope

Celadon Books
Hardcover
272 pages • $28.00
ISBN: 9781250784094
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A Survival Guide for Trying Times

Jane Goodall and Douglas Abrams

“From these conversations emerge an informative road map of ideas for ways in which every person may help bring about positive change in the world.”

—Barbara J. King, NPR

Looking at the headlines—the worsening climate crisis, a global pandemic, loss of biodiversity, political upheaval—it can be hard to feel optimistic. And yet hope has never been more desperately needed. Jane Goodall, the world’s most famous living naturalist, and Douglas Abrams, internationally bestselling coauthor of The Book of Joy, explore one of the most sought-after and least understood elements of human nature: hope. In The Book of Hope, Jane focuses on her “Four Reasons for Hope”: The Amazing Human Intellect, The Resilience of Nature, The Power of Young People, and The Indomitable Human Spirit. Drawing on decades of work that has helped expand our understanding of what it means to be human and what we all need to do to help build a better world, this book touches on vital questions including: How do we stay hopeful when everything seems hopeless? How do we cultivate hope in our children? What is the relationship between hope and action? While discussing the experiences that shaped her discoveries and beliefs, Jane tells the story of how she became a messenger of hope: from living through World War II to her years in Gombe to realizing she had to leave the forest to travel the world in her role as an advocate for environmental justice. The Book of Hope is a rare and intimate look not only at the nature of hope, but also into the heart and mind of a woman who revolutionized how we view the world around us and who has spent a lifetime fighting for our future.

Jane Goodall

© Andrew Zuckerman

Jane Goodall Dr. Jane Goodall DBE is an ethologist and environmentalist. From infancy she was fascinated by animal behavior, and in 1957 at 23 years old, she met the famous paleoanthropologist Dr. Louis Leakey while she was visiting a friend in Kenya. Impressed by her passion for animals, he offered her the chance to be the first person to study chimpanzees, our closest living relatives, in the wild. And so three years later Jane travelled from England to what is now Tanzania and, equipped with only a notebook, binoculars and determination to succeed, ventured into the then unknown world of wild chimpanzees. Jane Goodall’s research at Gombe national park has given us an in-depth understanding of chimpanzee behavior. The research continues, but in 1986, realizing the threat to chimpanzees throughout Africa, Jane travelled to six study sites. She learned first-hand not only about the problems facing chimpanzees, but also about those facing so many Africans living in poverty. She realized that only by helping local communities find ways of making a living without destroying the environment could chimpanzees be saved. Since then Jane has travelled the world raising awareness and learning about the threats we all face today, especially climate change and loss of biodiversity. Author of many books for adults and children and featured in countless documentaries and articles, Jane has reached millions around the world with her lectures, podcasts and writings. She was appointed as a UN Messenger of Peace, is a Dame of the British Empire and has received countless honors from around the world.

Normal Sucks

Normal Sucks

St. Martin’s Griffin
Paperback
256 pages • $17.99
ISBN: 9781250771261
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How to Live, Learn, and Thrive Outside the Lines

Jonathan Mooney

“As an accessible primer on reassessing disability and mental health, it’s invaluable, and as an exploration of what it’s like to grow up feeling different, it’s incredibly cathartic.”

—Vanity Fair

Growing up, it didn’t take long for Jonathan Mooney to figure out he was considered not normal. He was a neurodiverse kid diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD who didn’t learn to read until he was twelve, and trying to fit into the box of normalcy cost him his education, his sense of self, his friendships—and nearly his life. The realization that he wasn’t broken but the idea of normal was saved Mooney’s life. Framed as a letter to his own sons, Normal Sucks blends memoir, anecdote, and expertise to show us what happens to kids and adults who are trapped in environments that shame them and tell them, in both subtle and heartbreakingly blatant ways, that they are “not normal” and that they are the problem. Diving into the history of the concept, Mooney explores how people in power have used the term normal for centuries to keep diverse and outsider perspectives silent and compassionately investigates the lasting effects of shame, segregation, and oppression. But Mooney also offers hope—and a way forward—arguing that if we can reorient the ways in which we think about diversity and ability, if we can finally admit that “normal sucks,” then we can truly start a revolution. This inspiring book will move and empower us all to embrace and celebrate our differences. 

Jonathan Mooney

© Chris Mueller

Jonathan Mooney’s work has been featured in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, New York Magazine, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, HBO, NPR, and ABC News, and he continues to speak across the nation about neurological and physical diversity, inspiring those who live with differences and advocating for change. His books include The Short Bus and Learning Outside the Lines.

Normal Sucks has been adopted for First-Year Experience programs at:

Georgia Southern University; Onondaga Community College (NY); University of the District of Columbia; Western Carolina University (NC)

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Crossing the Line

Crossing the Line

St. Martin’s Griffin
Paperback
304 pages • $17.99
ISBN: 9781250837165
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A Fearless Team of Brothers and the Sport That Changed Their Lives Forever

Kareem Rosser

Crossing the Line is truly a special book. It will not just
leave you with hope, but also ideas on how to make that
hope transferable. Kareem’s remarkable story is one that
should be read and understood by all.”

Wes Moore, former White House Fellow, and New York Times bestselling author of The Other Wes Moore

Born and raised in West Philadelphia, Kareem thought he and his siblings would always be stuck in “The Bottom,” a community and neighborhood devastated by poverty and violence. Riding their bicycles through Philly’s Fairmount Park, Kareem’s brothers discover a barn full of horses. Noticing the brothers’ fascination with her misfit animals, Lezlie Hiner, founder of the Work to Ride stables, offers them their escape: an after-school job in exchange for riding lessons. What starts as an accidental discovery turns into a love for horseback riding that leads to the Rossers’ newfound passion for polo. Pursuing the sport with determination and discipline, Kareem earns his place among the typically exclusive players in college, becoming part of the first all-Black national interscholastic polo championship team—all while struggling to keep his family together. Crossing the Line is a story of the bonds of brotherhood, family loyalty, the transformative connection between man and horse, and overcoming impossible odds.

Kareem Rosser

© Daymar Rosser

Kareem Rosser is from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received a B.A. in economics from Colorado State University (CSU). While at CSU, he led his collegiate polo team to a national polo championship. At the same time, he was honored as the Intercollegiate Polo Player of the Year. After graduation, Kareem began working as a financial analyst at an asset management firm. Also, he serves as the Executive Director of a nonprofit fundraising arm called Friends of Work to Ride.

Crossing the Line has been adopted for First-Year Experience programs at:

Arcadia University (PA); Elms College (MA); and South Dakota State University

Somebody’s Daughter

Somebody's Daughter

Flatiron Books: An Oprah Book
Paperback
224 pages • $17.99
ISBN: 9781250203229
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A Memoir

Ashley C. Ford

Somebody’s Daughter is the heart-wrenching yet equally witty and wondrous story of how Ford came through the fire and emerged triumphant, as her own unapologetic, Black-girl self.”

—Bridgett M. Davis, The New York Times

Through poverty, adolescence, and a fraught relationship with her mother, Ashley Ford wishes she could turn to her father for hope and encouragement. There are just a few problems: he’s in prison, and she doesn’t know what he did to end up there. She doesn’t know how to deal with the incessant worries that keep her up at night or how to handle the changes in her body that draw unwanted attention from men. In her search for unconditional love, Ashley begins dating a boy her mother hates. When the relationship turns sour, he assaults her. Still reeling from the rape, which she keeps secret from her family, Ashley desperately searches for meaning in the chaos. Then, her grandmother reveals the truth about her father’s incarceration . . . and Ashley’s entire world is turned upside down. Somebody’s Daughter steps into the world of growing up a poor, Black girl in Indiana with a family fragmented by incarceration and explores how isolating and complex such a childhood can be. As Ashley battles her body and her environment, she embarks on a powerful journey to find the threads between who she is and what she was born into, and the complicated familial love that often binds them.

Ashley C. Ford

© Heather Sten

Ashley C. Ford is a writer, host, and educator who lives in Indianapolis, Indiana with her husband, poet and fiction writer Kelly Stacy, and their chocolate lab Astro Renegade Ford-Stacy. Ford is the former host of The Chronicles of Now podcast, co-host of The HBO companion podcast Lovecraft Country Radio, seasons one & three of MasterCard’s Fortune Favors The Bold, as well as the video interview series PROFILE by BuzzFeed News, and Brooklyn-based news & culture TV show, 112BK. She was also the host of the first season of Audible’s literary interview series, Authorized. She has been named among Forbes Magazine‘s 30 Under 30 in Media (2017), Brooklyn Magazine‘s Brooklyn 100 (2016), Time Out New York‘s New Yorkers of The Year (2017), and Variety’s New Power of New York (2019).

The Death of My Father the Pope

The Death of My Father the Pope

MCD Books
Paperback
304 pages • $18.00
ISBN: 9781250858900
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A Memoir

Obed Silva

“The Death of My Father the Pope details Silva’s compelling journey back to the homeland in Chihuahua, Mexico, to bury his father and make peace with their unresolved embattled relationship.”

—Rigoberto González,San Francisco Chronicle

A man mourning his alcoholic father faces a paradox: to pay tribute, lay scorn upon, or pour a drink. Weaving between the preparations for his father’s funeral and memories of life on both sides of the U.S.–Mexico border, Obed Silva chronicles his father’s alcoholism—a lifelong love that ended only at the age of forty-eight, at his death, having poisoned himself one Carta Blanca at a time. Addiction respects no borders; the havoc Silva’s father wreaked on his family not only followed them north, where mother and son moved to escape his violent, drunken rages, but also would make its effects felt even from the grave. With a wry cynicism; a profane, profound anger; an antic, brutally honest voice; and a hard-won classical frame of reference, Silva channels the heartbreak of mourning while wrestling with the resentment and frustration caused by addiction. The Death of My Father the Pope is a fluid and dynamic combination of memoir and an examination of the power of language and is the introduction of a unique and powerful literary voice.

Obed Silva

© Dario Debora

Born in Chihuahua, Mexico Obed Silva immigrated to the United States as a toddler. After years in the gang lifestyle—which left him paralyzed from the waist down, the result of a gunshot wound—he discovered the power of book learning, earned a master’s degree in medieval literature, and is now a respected English professor at East Los Angeles College. The Death of My Father the Pope is his first book.