Books for the First-Year Experience from Macmillan

First Year Experience Catalog cover Macmillan is pleased to offer a diverse selection of broadly appealing, critically acclaimed books—all of them ideally suited for First-Year Experience and Common  Reading programs.

Now, our latest catalog is online, and you can browse title by title, by theme, or by author. Then, request examination copies online, by email, by postal mail, or by fax. You can also download the catalog to view or print (10 MB PDF – Adobe Reader is required). You can also download our high resolution catalog here (18.6 MB PDF – Adobe Reader is required). Paper-and-ink catalogs are available by postal mail upon request*. (*Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, paper-and-ink catalogs are currently unavailable.)

Accessible yet challenging, timely yet classic, these are books that invite campus-wide discussion while also fostering individual growth, that ask questions and make demands of all who pick them up—books meant to open doors, change minds, undercut assumptions, spark debates.

Above all, these books will help students to succeed across all manner of academic disciplines by addressing them—and stimulating them, and moving them—as only the best books can. As a class or on their own, freshmen achieve their very best, as readers and as students, when they’re “on the same page” as their peers. That’s where these books come in.

How We Can Win

How We Can Win

Henry Holt and Co.
Hardcover
192 pages • $22.99
ISBN: 9781250805126
ebook icon
audiobook icon

Race, History and Changing the Money Game That’s Rigged

Kimberly Jones

Available in January 2022 

“In a voice that is equal parts clear, unflinching, and hopeful, Kimberly Jones fills in the missing pieces to the puzzle of Black American economic disparity. So much of the truth has been (purposely) hidden in the dark, but Kimberly brings the light. A must-read for everyone ready to fight for true equity.”

Layla F. Saad, New York Times bestselling author of White Supremacy and Me

“So if I played 400 rounds of monopoly with you and I had to play and give you every dime that I made, and then for 50 years, every time that I played, if you didn’t like what I did, you got to burn it like they did in Tulsa and like they did in Rosewood, how can you win? How can you win?” How We Can Win will expand upon statements Kimberly Jones made in a viral video posted in June 2020 following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of police. Through her personal experience, observations, and Monopoly analogy, she illuminates the economic disparities Black Americans have faced for generations and offers ways to fight against a system that is still rigged.

Kimberly Jones

© Dwayne Boyd

Kimberly Jones is a former bookseller, and now she hosts the Atlanta chapter of the popular Well-Read Black Girl book club. She has worked in film and television with trailblazing figures such as Tyler Perry, Whitney Houston, and 8Ball & MJG. In addition to writing YA novels, Jones is currently a director of feature films and cutting-edge diverse web series. She is the author (with Gilly Segal) of I’m Not Dying with You Tonight.

Dirty Work

Dirty Work

Farrar, Straus & Giroux
Hardcover
320 pages • $28.00
ISBN: 9780374140182
ebook icon
audiobook icon

Essential Jobs and Hidden Toll of
Inequality in America

Eyal Press

Dirty Work is about weighty moral questions, but it’s also about people, profiling dozens of workers and empathetically engaging with their crises of conscience . . .  A rigorously argued, compassionately framed moral appeal that for some readers might serve as a wake-up call.”

—Shelf Awareness

In Dirty Work, Eyal Press offers a paradigm-shifting view of the moral landscape of contemporary America through the stories of people who perform society’s most ethically troubling jobs. As Press shows, we are increasingly shielded and distanced from an array of morally questionable activities that other, less privileged people perform in our name. The COVID-19 pandemic has drawn unprecedented attention to the issue of “essential workers,” and to the health and safety risks to which workers in prisons and slaughterhouses are exposed. But Dirty Work examines another, less familiar set of occupational hazards: psychological and emotional hardships such as stigma, shame, PTSD, and moral injury. These burdens fall disproportionately on low-income workers, undocumented immigrants, women, and people of color. Illuminating the moving, at times harrowing stories of the people doing society’s dirty work, and incisively examining the structures of power and complicity that shape their lives, Press reveals fundamental truths about the moral dimensions of work, and the hidden costs of inequality in America.

Eyal Press

© Steven Kane

Eyal Press is an author and a journalist based in New York. The recipient of the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, an Andrew Carnegie fellowship, a Cullman Center fellowship at the New York Public Library, and a Puffin Foundation fellowship at Type Media Center, he is a contributor to The New YorkerThe New York Times, and numerous other publications. He is the author of Beautiful Souls and Absolute Convictions.

Somebody’s Daughter

Somebody's Daughter

Flatiron Books
Paperback
224 pages • $27.99
ISBN: 9781250305978
ebook icon
audiobook icon
Paperback available in May 2022

A Memoir

Ashley C. Ford

Somebody’s Daughter is the heart-wrenching yet equally witty and wondrous story of how Ford came through the fire and emerged triumphant, as her own unapologetic, Black-girl self.”

Bridgett M. Davis, The New York Times

Through poverty, adolescence, and a fraught relationship with her mother, Ashley Ford wishes she could turn to her father for hope and encouragement. There are just a few problems: he’s in prison, and she doesn’t know what he did to end up there. She doesn’t know how to deal with the incessant worries that keep her up at night or how to handle the changes in her body that draw unwanted attention from men. In her search for unconditional love, Ashley begins dating a boy her mother hates. When the relationship turns sour, he assaults her. Still reeling from the rape, which she keeps secret from her family, Ashley desperately searches for meaning in the chaos. Then, her grandmother reveals the truth about her father’s incarceration . . . and Ashley’s entire world is turned upside down. Somebody’s Daughter steps into the world of growing up a poor, Black girl in Indiana with a family fragmented by incarceration and explores how isolating and complex such a childhood can be. As Ashley battles her body and her environment, she embarks on a powerful journey to find the threads between who she is and what she was born into, and the complicated familial love that often binds them.

Ashley C. Ford

© Heather Sten

Ashley C. Ford is a writer, host, and educator who lives in Indianapolis, Indiana with her husband, poet and fiction writer Kelly Stacy, and their chocolate lab Astro Renegade Ford-Stacy. Ford is the former host of The Chronicles of Now podcast, co-host of The HBO companion podcast Lovecraft Country Radio, seasons one & three of MasterCard’s Fortune Favors The Bold, as well as the video interview series PROFILE by BuzzFeed News, and Brooklyn-based news & culture TV show, 112BK. She was also the host of the first season of Audible’s literary interview series, Authorized. She has been named among Forbes Magazine‘s 30 Under 30 in Media (2017), Brooklyn Magazine‘s Brooklyn 100 (2016), Time Out New York‘s New Yorkers of The Year (2017), and Variety’s New Power of New York (2019).

The Deeper the Roots

The Deeper the Roots

Flatiron Books
Hardcover
272 pages • $27.99
ISBN: 9781250173447
ebook icon
audiobook icon

A Memoir of Hope and Home

Michael Tubbs

“Insightful, emotional, and enraging. By sharing his story in gripping detail, Michael Tubbs embodies an old feminist tradition whereby the personal is political. He empowers us to fight for equal opportunities for our communities, and encourages us to amass the courage to overcome loss and injustice.”

Ibram X. Kendi, National Book Award-winning author of Stamped from the Beginning and How to Be an Antiracist

“Don’t tell nobody our business,” Michael Tubbs’ mother often told him growing up. For Tubbs, that meant a lot of things: Don’t tell anyone about the day-to-day struggle of living in poverty and being Black in Stockton, California. Don’t tell anyone about the pain of having a father incarcerated for twenty-five years to life. Don’t tell anyone about living two lives, the brainy bookworm and the kid with the newest Air Jordans. And also don’t tell anyone about the particular joys of growing up with three “moms”—a Nana who never let him miss church, an Auntie who’d take him to the library any time, and a mother “She-Daddy” who schooled him in the wisdom of hip hop and taught him to never take no for an answer. So Tubbs didn’t tell anyone his story, even as he went on to receive a scholarship to attend Stanford, intern in the Obama White House, and return to Stockton to become, in 2016 at age twenty-six, its first African American mayor and its youngest-ever mayor. The Deeper the Roots is affecting and urgent, a memoir astonishing in its candor and its clarity of vision. Tubbs shares with us the city that raised him, his family of badass women, his life-changing encounters with Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama, the challenges of governing in the twenty-first century, and everything in between—en route to unveiling his compelling vision for America rooted in his experiences in his hometown.

Michael Tubbs

© Timothy Archibald

Michael Tubbs served as the seventy-ninth mayor of Stockton, CA, his hometown. He was the city’s first Black mayor and the youngest ever mayor of a major American city. He is the founder of Mayors for a Guaranteed Income and EPIC (Ending Poverty in California), a Special Advisor to California Governor Newsom on Economic Mobility, and a commentator for MSNBC. Tubbs has been a fellow at the Harvard Institute of Politics, The MIT Media Lab, and the Stanford Design School. He has also served as a Stockton city councilmember and a high school educator. He lives with his partner, Anna Malaika Tubbs, and their children.

The Arbornaut

The Arbornaut

Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
Hardcover
368 pages • $28.00
ISBN: 9780374162696
ebook icon
audiobook icon

A Life Discovering the Eighth Continent in the Trees Above Us

Meg Lowman

Foreword by Sylvia A. Earle 

“Written . . . not just to instruct, but to reorient and inspire . . . If a tree was once understood as a mostly static living object, [through The Arbornaut] we see it rippling with change.”

Rebecca Griggs, The Atlantic

Welcome to the eighth continent! As a graduate student exploring the rain forests of Australia, Meg Lowman realized that she couldn’t monitor her beloved leaves using any of the usual methods. So she put together a climbing kit: she sewed a harness from an old seat belt, gathered hundreds of feet of rope, and found a tool belt for her pencils and rulers. Up she went, into the trees. Forty years later, Lowman remains one of the world’s foremost arbornauts, known as the “real-life Lorax.” She planned one of the first treetop walkways and helps create more of these bridges through the eighth continent all over the world. With a voice as infectious in its enthusiasm as it is practical in its optimism, The Arbornaut chronicles Lowman’s irresistible story. From climbing solo hundreds of feet into the air in Australia’s rainforests to measuring tree growth in the northeastern United States, from searching the redwoods of the Pacific coast for new life to studying leaf eaters in Scotland’s Highlands, from conducting a BioBlitz in Malaysia to conservation planning in India and collaborating with priests to save Ethiopia’s last forests, Lowman launches us into the life and work of a field scientist, ecologist, and conservationist. She offers hope, specific plans, and recommendations for action; despite devastation across the world, through trees, we can still make an immediate and lasting impact against climate change. A blend of memoir and fieldwork account, The Arbornaut gives us the chance to live among scientists and travel the world—even in a hot-air balloon! It is the engrossing, uplifting story of a nerdy tree climber—the only girl at the science fair—who becomes a giant inspiration, a groundbreaking, ground-defying field biologist, and a hero for trees everywhere.

Meg Lowman

© Carlton Ward

Meg Lowman, Ph.D. aka “CanopyMeg,” is an American biologist, educator, ecologist, writer, editor, and public speaker. She is the executive director of the TREE Foundation and a professor at the National University of Singapore, Arizona State University, and Universiti Sains Malaysia. Nicknamed the “real-life Lorax” by National Geographic and “Einstein of the treetops” by The Wall Street Journal, Lowman pioneered the science of canopy ecology. Her motto is “no child left indoors.” She travels extensively for research, outreach, and speaking engagements for audiences large and small.

The Hospital

The Hospital

St. Martin’s Press
Hardcover
320 pages • $28.99
ISBN: 9781250237354
ebook icon
audiobook icon

Life, Death, and Dollars in A Small American Town

Brian Alexander

Paperback edition available in March 2022

“From the C-suite’s tension-filled strategic planning meetings to life-or-death moments at the bedside, Alexander nimbly and grippingly translates the byzantine world of American health care into a real-life narrative with people you come to care about.”

Mona Hanna-Attisha, The New York Times

The Hospital takes readers into the world of American sickness in a way no book has done before. Americans are dying sooner, and living in poorer health. By immersing the reader in the fight of one hospital to continue serving its community, and in the struggles of patients who walk––or are carried––through its doors to survive the economic and political forces arrayed against them, Alexander strips away manufactured complexity and wonky debates to expose the human cost of the war being waged on Americans by the medical industry, politicians, and big business. The community hospital in Bryan, Ohio, is losing money, making it vulnerable to big health systems seeking domination. Phil Ennen, the hospital’s CEO, has been campaigning to preserve its independence. Meanwhile, Bryan, a town of 8,500 people in Ohio’s northwest corner, is still trying to recover from the Great Recession. As local leaders struggle to address the town’s problems, and the hospital fights for its life amid a rapidly consolidating medical and hospital industry, a thirty-nine-year-old diabetic fights for his limbs, a fifty-five-year-old contractor lies dying in the emergency room, and a pastor prays that his flock will see better days and better health. Americans have become victims of a “system” they don’t understand. By explaining how we got here, how powerful the system stacked against us has become, and why it nearly collapsed when the Covid-19 pandemic hit, The Hospital offers a bracing, clarifying look at America’s century-old health dilemmas.

Brian Alexander

© Cassandra Gillig

Brian Alexander, the award-winning author of Glass House, is a contributing writer to The Atlantic. He has written for The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Esquire, among others. He has spoken at the Obama Foundation Summit, and in Washington to members of the Senate and House of Representatives. He lives in San Diego, California.

Rise Up!

Rise Up

Henry Holt and Co. BYR
Hardcover
256 pages • $19.99
ISBN: 9781250226389
ebook icon

How You Can Join the Fight Against White Supremacy

Dr. Crystal Marie Fleming

“A clear and damning appraisal of the United States’ longstanding relationship with white supremacy—with actionable advice for readers to do better . . . Through anecdotes and thorough research, Fleming leaves readers not just with a detailed account of the problems, but concludes with five things they can do to work toward justice. A smart guide to understanding and living anti-racism.”

—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Why are white supremacists still openly marching in the United States? Why are undocumented children of color separated from their families and housed in cages? Where did racism come from? Why hasn’t it already disappeared? And what can young people do about it? Rise Up! breaks down the origins of racial injustice and its continued impact today, connecting dots between the past and present. By including contemporary examples ripped from headlines and actionable ways young people can help create a more inclusive world, sociologist Dr. Crystal Fleming shares the knowledge and values that unite all antiracists: compassion, solidarity, respect, and courage in the face of adversity.

Crystal M. Fleming

© Nicole Mondestin

Dr. Crystal M. Fleming is an award-winning sociologist and writer. She is professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at Stony Brook University. Crystal completed her Ph.D. at Harvard University and publishes scholarly research on racial oppression and anti-racism. She is the author of an academic book on race and white supremacy in France, as well as the critically acclaimed How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide. Her work appears in Newsweek, The Root, Huffington Post, and more.

Crossing the Line

Crossing the Line

St. Martin’s Griffin
Paperback
304 pages • $17.99
ISBN: 9781250837165
ebook icon
audiobook icon

A Fearless Team of Brothers and the Sport That Changed Their Lives Forever

Kareem Rosser

Crossing the Line is truly a special book. It will not just
leave you with hope, but also ideas on how to make that
hope transferable. Kareem’s remarkable story is one that
should be read and understood by all.”

Wes Moore, former White House Fellow, and New York Times bestselling author of The Other Wes Moore

Born and raised in West Philadelphia, Kareem thought he and his siblings would always be stuck in “The Bottom,” a community and neighborhood devastated by poverty and violence. Riding their bicycles through Philly’s Fairmount Park, Kareem’s brothers discover a barn full of horses. Noticing the brothers’ fascination with her misfit animals, Lezlie Hiner, founder of the Work to Ride stables, offers them their escape: an after-school job in exchange for riding lessons. What starts as an accidental discovery turns into a love for horseback riding that leads to the Rossers’ newfound passion for polo. Pursuing the sport with determination and discipline, Kareem earns his place among the typically exclusive players in college, becoming part of the first all-Black national interscholastic polo championship team—all while struggling to keep his family together. Crossing the Line is a story of the bonds of brotherhood, family loyalty, the transformative connection between man and horse, and overcoming impossible odds.

Kareem Rosser

© Daymar Rosser

Kareem Rosser is from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received a B.A. in economics from Colorado State University (CSU). While at CSU, he led his collegiate polo team to a national polo championship. At the same time, he was honored as the Intercollegiate Polo Player of the Year. After graduation, Kareem began working as a financial analyst at an asset management firm. Also, he serves as the Executive Director of a nonprofit fundraising arm called Friends of Work to Ride.

When They Call You a Terrorist

When They Call You a Terrorist

St. Martin’s Griffin
Paperback
288 pages • $16.99
ISBN: 9781250306906
ebook icon
audiobook icon

A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Patrisse Khan-Cullors & asha bandele

With a foreword by Angela Davis

When They Call You a Terrorist is more than just a reflection on the American criminal justice system. It’s a call to action for readers to change a culture that allows for violence against people of color.”

Time

For Patrisse Khan-Cullors, the most vulnerable people in the country are Black people. Deliberately and ruthlessly targeted by a criminal justice system serving a white privilege agenda, Black people are subjected to unjustifiable racial profiling and police brutality. In 2013, when Trayvon Martin’s killer went free, Patrisse’s outrage led her to co-found Black Lives Matter with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi. Condemned as terrorists and as a threat to America, these loving women founded a hashtag that birthed the movement to demand accountability from the authorities who continually turn a blind eye to the injustices inflicted upon people of Black and Brown skin. Patrisse is a survivor. She transformed her personal pain into political power, giving voice to a people suffering
inequality and a movement fueled by her strength and love to tell the country—and the world—that Black Lives Matter.

Patrisse Khan-Cullors (c) Curtis Moore

© Curtis Moore

asha bandele (c) Michael Hnatov Photography

© Michael Hnatov Photography

Patrisse Khan-Cullors is an artist, organizer, and freedom fighter from Los Angeles, California. Co-founder of Black Lives Matter, she is also a performance artist, Fulbright scholar, public speaker, and the 2017 Sydney Peace Prize recipient.

asha bandele is the award-winning author of The Prisoner’s Wife and four other works. Honored for her work in journalism and activism, asha is a mother, a former senior editor at Essence, and a senior director at the Drug Policy Alliance.

When They Call You a Terrorist has been adopted for 7 First-Year Experience programs, including at:

University of Richmond; Northern Illinois University (two consecutive years); East Los Angeles College (CA) (two consecutive years); Tuskegee University (AL); University of Washington Bothell and Cascadia College

Continue reading