Category Archives: Gender

Eat the Apple

EAT THE APPLE -- Cover Art

Bloomsbury
Hardcover
272 pages • $26.00
ISBN: 9781632869500
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A Memoir

Matt Young

“Young is a frank, funny and mercilessly self-lacerating narrator. His writing is entertaining and experimental . . . Eat the Apple is a brilliant and barbed memoir of the Iraq War.”

—Maureen Corrigan, NPR, Fresh Air

Eat the Apple is a daring, twisted, and darkly hilarious story of American youth and masculinity in an age of continuous war. Matt Young joined the Marine Corps at age eighteen after a drunken night culminating in wrapping his car around a fire hydrant. The teenage wasteland he fled followed him to the training bases charged with making him a Marine. Matt survived the training and then not one, not two, but three deployments to Iraq, where the testosterone, danger, and stakes for him and his fellow grunts were dialed up a dozen decibels. Visceral, ironic, self-lacerating, and ultimately redemptive, Young’s story drops us unarmed into Marine Corps culture and lays bare the absurdism of 21st century war, the manned-up vulnerability of those on the front lines, and the true, if often misguided, motivations that drove a young man to a life at war. Searing in its honesty, tender in its vulnerability, and brilliantly written, Eat the Apple is a modern war classic in the making and a powerful coming-of-age story that maps the insane geography of our times.

© Tara Monterosso

Matt Young holds an MA in Creative Writing from Miami University and is the recipient of fellowships with Words After War and the Carey Institute for Global Good. His work can be found in Tin House, Word Riot, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. He is a combat veteran, and lives in Olympia, Washington, where he teaches writing.

Native Country of the Heart

Native Country of the Heart

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Hardcover
256 pages • $25.00
ISBN: 9780374219666
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A Memoir

Cherríe Moraga

Available in April 2019

Native Country of the Heart is, at its core, a mother-daughter story. The mother, Elvira, was hired out as a child, along with her siblings, by their own father to pick cotton in California’s Imperial Valley. The daughter, Cherríe Moraga, is a brilliant, pioneering, queer Latina feminist. The story of these two women, and of their people, is woven together in an intimate memoir of critical reflection and deep personal revelation. As a young woman, Elvira left California to work as a cigarette girl in glamorous late-1920s Tijuana, where an ambiguous relationship with a wealthy white man taught her life lessons about power, sex, and opportunity. As Moraga charts her mother’s journey—from impressionable young girl to battle-tested matriarch to, later on, an old woman suffering under the yoke of Alzheimer’s—she traces her own self-discovery of her gender-queer body and lesbian identity, as well as her passion for activism and the history of her pueblo. As her mother’s memory fails, Moraga is driven to unearth forgotten remnants of a U.S. Mexican diaspora, its indigenous origins, and an American story of cultural loss.

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© Daniela Rossell

Cherríe L. Moraga is a writer and an activist. A former Artist-in-Residence at Stanford, Moraga was recently appointed a professor in the Department of English at UC-Santa Barbara, where, with her artistic partner Celia Herrera Rodriguez, she will institute Las Maestras Center for Chicana and Indigenous Thought and Art Practice. She co-edited (with Gloria Anzaldúa)
the highly influential volume, This Bridge Called My Back.

A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing

A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing

Bloomsbury
Hardcover
192 pages • $25.00
ISBN: 9781635572612
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The Incarceration of African American Women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland

DaMaris B. Hill

“DaMaris B. Hill writes the poetry of the bound black woman across the ages in this haunting, powerful collection. What you will read here is not just poetry, though. This book offers an education. This book bears witness. This book is a reckoning.”

—Roxane Gay

From Harriet Tubman to Assata Shakur, Ida B. Wells to Sandra Bland and Black Lives Matter, black women freedom fighters have braved violence, scorn, despair, and isolation in order to lodge their protests. For black American women, the experience of being bound has taken many forms: from the bondage of slavery to the Reconstruction-era criminalization of women; from the brutal constraints of Jim Crow to our own era’s prison industrial complex, where between 1980 and 2014, the number of incarcerated women increased by 700%.* For those women who lived and died resisting the dehumanization of confinement—physical, social, intellectual—the threat of being bound was real, constant, and lethal. In this narrative-in-verse, Hill presents bitter, unflinching history that artfully captures the personas of these captivating, bound yet unbridled African-American women. Hill’s passionate odes to Zora Neale Hurston, Lucille Clifton, Fannie Lou Hamer, Grace Jones, Eartha Kitt, and others also celebrate the modern-day inheritors of their load and light, binding history, author, and reader in an essential legacy of struggle.
* (The Sentencing Project)

Damaris Hill

© Tony Rance

DaMaris B. Hill is assistant professor of Creative Writing and African American and Africana studies at the University of Kentucky. Her previous works are The Fluid Boundaries of Suffrage and Jim Crow: Staking Claims in the American Heartland, and a collection of poetry, \Vi-ze-bel\\Teks-chers\. She has two Ph.D.s, one in English and one in women and gender studies. A former service member of the United States Air Force, she lives in Lexington, Kentucky.

The 57 Bus

The 57 Bus

Farrar, Straus, and Giroux BYR
Hardcover
320 pages • $17.99
ISBN: 9780374303235
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A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That Changed Their Lives

Dashka Slater

Winner of the Stonewall Book Award

“It is likely that this account will spark conversations, debates, and contemplation, perhaps leading readers to define for themselves what justice means.”

VOYA

One teenager in a skirt. One teenager with a lighter.
One moment that changes both of their lives forever.
If it weren’t for the 57 bus, Sasha and Richard never would have met. Both were high school students from Oakland, California, one of the most diverse cities in the country, but they inhabited different worlds. Sasha, a white teen, lived in the middle-class foothills and attended a small private school. Richard, a black teen, lived in the crime-plagued flatlands and attended a large public one. Each day, their paths overlapped for a mere eight minutes. But one afternoon on the bus ride home from school, a single reckless act left Sasha severely burned, and Richard charged with two hate crimes and facing life imprisonment. The case garnered international attention, thrusting both teenagers into the spotlight.

Dashka Slater

© Jacinta Bouwkamp

Dashka Slater has written many books, including Baby Shoes, The Sea Serpent and Me, Escargot, and Dangerously Ever After. She is also an award-winning journalist whose articles have appeared in Newsweek, Salon, The New York Times Magazine, and Mother Jones. She lives in California.

The 57 Bus  has been selected for First-Year Experience programs at:

The Fashion Institute of Technology (NY); Johnson State College (Northern Vermont University)

How I Resist

How I Resist

Wednesday Books
Paperback
224 pages • $18.99
ISBN: 9781250168368
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Activism and Hope for a New Generation

Edited by Maureen Johnson

“The world is a bit of a mess, but it’s not always easy to figure out ways to help . . . How I Resist is a perfect activism guidebook, featuring essays, stories, songs, and more from celebrities and some of the biggest names in YA. Even in dark times, this anthology promotes hope, showing how individual voices and efforts can truly make a difference.”

Bustle

Now, more than ever, young people are motivated to make a difference in a world they’re bound to inherit. They’re ready to stand up and be heard—but with much to shout about, where do they begin? What can I do? How can I help? How I Resist is the response, and a way to start the conversation. To show readers that they are not helpless, and that anyone can be the change. A collection of essays, songs, illustrations, and interviews about activism and hope, How I Resist features an all-star group of contributors, including, Modern Family’s Jesse Tyler Ferguson and his husband Justin Mikita, Alex Gino, Hebh Jamal, Malinda Lo, Dylan Marron, Junauda Petrus, Jason Reynolds, Maya Rupert, Ali Stroker, Jonny Sun (aka @jonnysun), Sabaa Tahir, Shaina Taub, and more, all edited and compiled by Maureen Johnson. In How I Resist, readers will find hope and support through voices that are at turns personal, funny, irreverent, and instructive. Not just for a young adult audience, this incredibly impactful collection will appeal to readers of all ages who are feeling adrift and looking for guidance.

Maureen Johnson

© Heather Weston

Maureen Johnson is the New York Times bestselling author of over a dozen young adult novels, including 13 Little Blue Envelopes, The Name of the Star, and Truly Devious. She is also the co-host of Says Who, a political podcast about the aftermath of the 2016 election. She lives in New York City.

One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter

Ants Among Elephants

Picador
Paperback
256 pages • $16.00
ISBN: 9781250121028
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Essays

Scaachi Koul

“Drawing comparisons to Mindy Kaling and Roxane Gay, Koul is a voice for outsiders, children of immigrants and just about any other millennial trying to make their way in today’s perplexing world with this entertaining and thought-provoking collection of essays.”

Rolling Stone

In One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, Scaachi Koul deploys her razor-sharp humor to share all the fears, outrages, and mortifying moments of her life. She learned from an early age what made her miserable, and for Scaachi anything can be cause for despair. Whether it’s a shopping trip gone awry; enduring awkward conversations with her bikini waxer; overcoming her fear of flying while vacationing halfway around the world; dealing with Internet trolls, or navigating the fears and anxieties of her parents. Alongside these personal stories are pointed observations about life as a woman of color: where every aspect of her appearance is open for critique, derision, or outright scorn; where strict gender rules bind in both Western and Indian cultures, leaving little room for a woman not solely focused on marriage and children to have a career (and a life) for herself. With a sharp eye and biting wit, incomparable rising star and cultural observer Scaachi Koul offers a hilarious, scathing, and honest look at modern life.

© Barbora Simkova

Scaachi Koul was born and raised in Calgary, Alberta, and is a culture writer for BuzzFeed. Her writing has also appeared in The New Yorker, The Hairpin, The Globe and Mail, and Jezebel. One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter is her first book. She lives in Toronto.

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Look Alive Out There

Look Alive Out There

MCD
Hardcover
256 pages • $26.00
ISBN: 9780374279844
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Paperback available in April 2019

Essays

Sloane Crosley

“Crosley remains inexorably funny, even as she uses her life and the lives she encounters to take on the heavier issues of aging, loneliness and mortality . . . Look Alive Out There preserves Crosley’s instinct to observe minutiae and uncover answers to universal questions, while introducing a new willingness to acknowledge that sometimes stories don’t end with such neat answers.”

The New York Times Book Review

Fans of Sloane Crosley’s previous essay collections know her life as a series of relatable but madcap misadventures. In Look Alive Out There, whether it’s scaling active volcanoes, crashing shivas, playing herself on Gossip Girl, befriending swingers, or staring down the barrel of the fertility gun, Crosley continues to rise to the occasion with unmatchable nerve and electric one-liners. And as her subjects become more serious, her essays deliver not just laughs but lasting emotional heft and insight. Crosley has taken up the gauntlets thrown by her predecessors—Dorothy Parker, Nora Ephron, David Sedaris—and crafted something rare, affecting, and true. With Look Alive Out There, Crosley’s essays have managed to grow simultaneously more sophisticated and even funnier. And yet she’s still very much herself, and it’s great to have her back—and not a moment too soon (or late, for that matter). The characteristic heart and punch-packing observations are back, but with a newfound coat of maturity. A thin coat. More of a blazer, really.

Sloane Crosley

© Caitlin Mitchell

Sloane Crosley is the author of the novel, The Clasp, and two New York Times bestselling books of personal essays, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, a finalist for the Thurber Prize for American Humor, and How Did You Get This Number. A contributing editor and books columnist for Vanity Fair, she lives in Manhattan.

 

 

 

 

 

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